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Cricket Bats

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Discount Cricket Outlet huge online store retail cricket bats from the world's top brands and we only choose the finest in cricket equipment.

The cricket bats vary in size, weight and price accordingly with higher and lower middles to the bat. We employ specific people to hand select the best cricket bats available from each supplier, thus ensuring only the best bats leave our warehouse.

Discount Cricket Outlet's biggest selling bats are as follows:-

Adidas cricket bats

Gray Nicolls cricket bats

Gunn and Moore cricket bats

Kookaburra cricket bats

New Balance cricket bats

Puma cricket bats

Slazenger cricket bats

Spartan cricket bats

With the best prices in the UK, there is no better place to purchase your new cricket bat.

About Cricket Bats

Cricket bats are made from wood from a tree called the Cricket bat Willow (Salix alba caerulea). This willow has two qualities - it is quite light, but also quite tough. Perfect for a batsman to hold and hit the ball as hard as possible to the boundary.

When a cricket bat is new, it needs to be artificially processed to be usable in cricket. Applying linseed oil can help achieve this. The linseed oil seeps into the cricket bat. It slowly starts to dry and shrinks the fibres of the bat together, making the bat much tougher to play cricket with. You can accelerate this by hitting the oiled cricket bat with a cricket ball. After hours of hitting the bat, the fibres become much straighter and harder. This process is called 'knocking-in'.

Playing with a bat that hasnt been knocked in will cause the fibres of the willow to become loose and ultimately break the bat over a period of time.

Other kinds of cricket bats

Throughout cricketing history, people have tried to make cricket bats from different materials. In December 1979, Dennis Lillee came out to play in an Australia vs England test match using a bat made not of willow but of aluminium called ComBat. It was a new kind of bat that was tougher and lighter than willow bats. But after sometime, Lillee had to switch to an ordinary bat as the English side claimed that the ComBat damaged the cricket ball and rules were changed appropriately.

Another innovation is to make the bat handle from carbon nano fibres. The handle becomes much lighter and the striking area heavier with more wood on the face of the cricket bat. The heavier the striking are, the more force it hits the ball with and ultimately the further the ball should travel.

An innovation that was tried in 2005 by the Australian cricket team was to use a cricket bat coated with graphite. Graphite is light, yet it adds a lot of toughness to the bat. That means the bat can last for much longer, and you don't have to knock it in. The International Cricket Council did not accept this bat, on the grounds that other teams did not have access to this bat and it gained an unfair advantage.

Future cricket bats

Cricket has evolved from 5 day Test Matches into faster versions of the game. New materials are needed to make bats that will help batsmen score a greater number of fours and sixes. Keep your eyes peeled as in time we will see even further inventions from manufacturers such as; Kookaburra, Gray Nicolls or Adidas on cricket bats throughout the cricketing world.